28
Sep
10

Blah Blah Blah NFL Negotiations Blah

The owners and NFLPA meet today for the first time in what seems like forever to help stave off a potential lockout/strike for the 2011 season. With teams giving the go-ahead for the union to decertify left and right, we’re getting a little (read: A LOT) concerned about the state of the 2011 NFL season. Yes, on one hand it’s incredibly infuriating that you have millionaire crying about being treated unfairly (players), while you have billionaires who are too stubborn to lose a fraction of their income (owners).  It can seem to be a bit much to keep track of, so Laura and I are here to provide the quick and dirty guide on a few of the hot-button topics between the owner and the NFLPA.

18 Game Schedule

Laura: Hmmm, an 18 game schedule. I am not sure this is a subject I SHOULD have an opinion on. After all, I am a lowly PR professional and have never had the determination, strength or ability to compete at a high level in sports. I only like to watch it on TV and generally prefer that someone else entertain me with insane grabs in the end zone (Devin Hester, you are ridiculous!) , beautiful spirals and the crunch of great tackle when helmet meets pads. I work hard at my job daily and sometimes stress or longer hours makes me eat a little less healthy or feel worn out. But I don’t put my longevity and health on the line weekly for the entertainment of others.

I don’t want to hear it’s what they get paid for. I know that, I went to college. I am just pointing out, it’s not really for me to have an opinion on whether or not they should put their big, strong bodies against other insanely strong and big bodies for more games that count during the season. The risks here are high. What I will do is point out a few pros and cons if the 18 games will be passed (and it’s looking more likely every day.)

Pros

–          Everyone will make more money (players, owners, merchandisers, television stations etc).

–          The football season (that matters) will be longer, I love that, it’s too short already.

–          Fans will love it–two more weeks of tailgating, drinking and screaming on Sunday? Sold.

 Cons

–          No matter how you slice it, the athletes’ careers will be shorter

–          Preseason serves a purpose–one of my favorite players of all time is Tom Waddle, he would have never seen a start in a Bears uniform if it weren’t for his preseason performance. There are countless other examples that verify this claim–see: Sam’s Dennis Dixon.

–          Playoffs may prove to be less exciting as two more games every season are undeniably going to wear these guys out.

–          There could be  more tragedy in the game. An increased schedule increasing the chances of injury.  

Rookie Salary Cap

Sam: Unlike Laura, I do have an opinion and, if you know me a loud one 🙂 I’m siding with the NFLPA on this one. There absolutely, 100% SHOULD be a rookie salary cap. How many times have we seen a rookie sign a ridiculous contract for a crazy amount of money and get hurt in the beginning of the season because of the heightened level of play? Matt Stafford, Kellen Winslow Jr. and my boy Paul Posluzny come to mind.

Or worse yet, how about when a player is signed and just plain SUCKS in the NFL? Akilli Smith? David Carr? Carson Palmer (yes he SUCKS), JAMARCUS RUSSELL or Ki-Jana Carter? These 22-year-old kids enter the NFL and are set financially for life before they take their first snap on the field. What’s worse, is that if their proposed contract isn’t at a tacky and gaudy level-well, then they hold out and refuse to sign. Before they step foot on the field. See, I’m in this camp that you have to PROVE your worth before you get a diva attitude and I agree with the NFLPA that the money that, more often than not, is WASTED on rookie talent would serve a better purpose to veteran players that have already proved their worth and have sacrificed their bodies for the game.

Perecentage of Revenue to Players

Currently, players receive 59% of owner revenue for salary purposes–a percentage which the owners want to decrease citing increased costs. Which, let’s get serious, is a bullshit claim. Even with the recession, the owners are making an ISH load of money…the average NFL team is valued at 1.2 billion dollars–down from 1.4 billion last year. While that drop is alarming, it doesn’t justify screwing the players to a lower percentage of revenue. They are the money makers, they are the ones that sacrifice their bodies (albeit for a ridiculous amount of money). I do not watch football to see Jerry Jones or Al Davis (although they think I do), I watch it for the ATHLETES. The amount of money that it costs a FAN (’cause that’s who it’s really all about..right? ;)) to go see a game is ABSURD, and I do not believe it’s because the players take 59% of revenue. I believe it’s ’cause the owners are greedy and mark the hell up out of their product. It’s simple, we all do, that’s good business, but what’s bad business is to be a cheap skate and screw your employees and make them disgruntled.  Need more proof? see Clark Griswold’s reaction below to finding out that his Christmas bonus is to be enrolled in a Jelly Of The Month Club 😉

OOOOH we KNOW you have opinions.

Lay ’em on us!

–Laura and Sam

Advertisements

1 Response to “Blah Blah Blah NFL Negotiations Blah”


  1. October 3, 2010 at 11:15 am

    Awesome… do u want to link exchange with me?


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 6 other followers

Tweet Me!


%d bloggers like this: